Vinyl Siding Cost per Sq. Ft. in 2017: Foam-Backed Vs Hollow Siding

There’s nothing more unseemly than peeling paint or badly worn out siding on a house. We’ve all heard the suggestion that first impressions matter and when it comes to the exterior appearance of your home, that couldn’t be more true! 😉

vinyl-siding-on-a-cape-style-home

If your siding needs replacing, it’s best to do it as soon as possible. This is a job that is probably best left to professionals, unless it’s something you’ve done before, and you happen to have all the necessary tools including metal trim break, ladders and platforms, plus a handy and reliable friend willing to help. 😉

Basic Breakdown of Material and Labor Costs

On average, foam-backed vinyl siding will cost between $5.00 and $10.00 per square foot installed on a simple single-story house. So, for a typical house requiring some 2,000 sq. ft. of siding installed, your total cost will be between $10,000 and $20,000 for materials and labor.

Some homeowners may opt for a less-costly non-insulated siding option which would cost about $3.50 to $7.00 per sq. ft. to install on average or about 30% less than foam-backed option.

In addition to the cost of the job, you may also have to pay for the removal and disposal of the old siding. Lastly, you will need to take into the account the cost of obtaining a building permit from your local town hall. This cost will vary depending on your location.

Materials Basics

vinyl-siding-on-a-house

When installing a new vinyl siding on your house, you will have a few choices of materials ranging from basic to premium. In most cases, standard options should work just fine for most homes.

Some contractors may charge more for the entire job including labor, if you choose to go with a premium option. On the low-end, your siding materials will cost about $1.00+ per square foot.

A standard, middle of the road option will cost about $1.50 per square foot. A more premium option will cost $2.00+ per square foot. All else being equal, premium colors and styles or patterns will cost more. In addition to the cost of materials, you will also need to consider the cost of aluminum trim for windows, etc.

Continue reading “Vinyl Siding Cost per Sq. Ft. in 2017: Foam-Backed Vs Hollow Siding”

How to Install Vinyl Siding – DIY Guide

Arguably, the best way to install lap vinyl siding is to get a professional siding contractor to do the job for you. That’s also twice as expensive as the alternative approach of doing it yourself. Since vinyl siding is only moderately challenging to install, at least on simple one-story homes, let’s walk through the process.

What this guide entails:

1. Tools and Materials for hanging siding
2. Insulation
3. Removing Old Siding
4. Quality Window and Door Trim
5. Preliminary Steps for Hanging Siding
6. Guide for Hanging Siding Pieces
7. Wrapping Up

Tools and Materials For Hanging Siding

The must have tools include:

  • Hammer – for fastening all pieces
  • Tin Snips – for cutting all pieces
  • Level – for aligning pieces horizontally and vertically
  • Tape Measure
  • Chalk line – ensures material is on a level line
  • Ladder(s)

via VinylSiding.org

Additional tool considerations:

  • Speed square – marking pieces with straight edge or as miter square for marking angled cuts, also as a protractor for measuring roof pitch
  • Circular Saw – alternative tool to tin snips, need to use a proper blade
  • Saw Horse – if using a circular saw
  • Stud Finder – to locate the optimal place for nails that hang siding
  • (Do not use) A Nail Gun – Siding is hung, not tightly fastened to walls
  • Pencil and paper – for notes along the way
  • Another human – Not really a tool, but this isn’t a project you can do alone, get a friend to help

Materials:

  • Nails
  • Housewrap – also known as underlayment, provides moisture barrier, and sheathing over exterior walls
  • Siding system – which usually includes:
  • 12 foot siding panels (of your choice)
  • J-channel – often 12 ft. in length, trim pieces used for inside corners and around window, doors, etc.
  • Utility channel – also known as utility trim or undersill (often used under windows)
  • Corner moldings – also known as outside corner posts
  • Starter strips – where to start all walls that will receive siding
  • Drip Caps – additional pieces placed along top surfaces of doorways and windows.

Continue reading “How to Install Vinyl Siding – DIY Guide”