How to Install Vinyl Siding – DIY Guide

Arguably, the best way to install lap vinyl siding is to get a professional siding contractor to do the job for you. That’s also twice as expensive as the alternative approach of doing it yourself. Since vinyl siding is only moderately challenging to install, at least on simple one-story homes, let’s walk through the process.

What this guide entails:

1. Tools and Materials for hanging siding
2. Insulation
3. Removing Old Siding
4. Quality Window and Door Trim
5. Preliminary Steps for Hanging Siding
6. Guide for Hanging Siding Pieces
7. Wrapping Up

Tools and Materials For Hanging Siding

The must have tools include:

  • Hammer – for fastening all pieces
  • Tin Snips – for cutting all pieces
  • Level – for aligning pieces horizontally and vertically
  • Tape Measure
  • Chalk line – ensures material is on a level line
  • Ladder(s)

via VinylSiding.org

Additional tool considerations:

  • Speed square – marking pieces with straight edge or as miter square for marking angled cuts, also as a protractor for measuring roof pitch
  • Circular Saw – alternative tool to tin snips, need to use a proper blade
  • Saw Horse – if using a circular saw
  • Stud Finder – to locate the optimal place for nails that hang siding
  • (Do not use) A Nail Gun – Siding is hung, not tightly fastened to walls
  • Pencil and paper – for notes along the way
  • Another human – Not really a tool, but this isn’t a project you can do alone, get a friend to help

Materials:

  • Nails
  • Housewrap – also known as underlayment, provides moisture barrier, and sheathing over exterior walls
  • Siding system – which usually includes:
  • 12 foot siding panels (of your choice)
  • J-channel – often 12 ft. in length, trim pieces used for inside corners and around window, doors, etc.
  • Utility channel – also known as utility trim or undersill (often used under windows)
  • Corner moldings – also known as outside corner posts
  • Starter strips – where to start all walls that will receive siding
  • Drip Caps – additional pieces placed along top surfaces of doorways and windows.

Continue reading “How to Install Vinyl Siding – DIY Guide”

House Siding Options, Plus Costs, Pros & Cons 2020

There are several different material options for house siding: wood, metal, stone, vinyl, brick, fiber-cement, stucco and more. But, looking at the materials for siding is just scratching the surface! Delving deeper, we see many more options and sub-options.

The only limitations are your imagination. We’ll cover primary options plus a few sub-options in this guide. Special note: all cost related information is based mostly on the 2019 information.

1. Wood
2. Vinyl
3. Fiber Cement
4. Stucco
5. Brick
6. Metal
7. Stone

Material Category: Wood (4 Primary Options)

lpsmartside-lap-trim-house

The main options relate to how the material is installed, such as: bevel, shingles, board-and-batten, and split-log. There are numerous sub-options, as wood has several grains, many ways to cut / shape it, and thousands of color choices.

Within this category we include Engineered Wood. Also known as composite wood, man-made wood, or manufactured board. Natural wood obviously comes directly from timber, while the man-made version is manufactured from wood fibers, saw dust, and bonding agents. It’s a strong, light-weight and less expensive alternative. Instead of pieces cut from logs, the material is shaped to match the order for a job.

Wood Siding Costs Installed, Plus ROI

Natural wood material is relatively expensive, considering the cost of initial investment and the ongoing maintenance costs.

On average, natural wood siding costs between $7.50 to $12.50 per sq. ft. installed. This range depends on grain and grade mainly, as well as the style option. The costs will be higher in more affluent areas, as natural wood is considered a premium material

Engineered wood costs $5.50 to $11.50 per sq. ft. installed. The $10 to $11.50 range is on the high-end, and a more fair range is $7.50 to $9.50 per sq. ft. installed. This option generally requires a little less maintenance.

Pricing for the installation on the entire house will have a fairly wide range, but this is usually due to region, and variations in contractor pricing. If there are other factors.

To install natural wood as cladding for an averaged sized home, it costs $14,500 to $25,500.

With Engineered Wood, it is roughly 30% less or $10,500 to $18,500.

ROI for Engineered Wood siding is nearly 79%, and higher than natural wood’s 77%, which is among the lowest of all siding options.

Continue reading “House Siding Options, Plus Costs, Pros & Cons 2020”