Steel Log Siding Cost and Pros & Cons in 2022 – ROI and More

Steel log siding is a unique type of siding made from steel that looks like real wood logs. It was invented and is manufactured in Colorado, where strong siding is a must to stand up to extreme weather.

TrueLog Steel Siding Canyon Red

On average, steel log siding cost is $8.50 to $16.50 per square foot for the material and professional installation. The cost range reflects differences in material options, installation complexity, and your home’s location (robustness of the local home remodeling and real estate market).

By comparison, natural wood log siding ranges from $10.50 to $17.50 per square foot installed.

This guide focuses on steel log siding cost, pros and cons, durability, the return on your investment in terms of your home’s value. Along the way, we’ll make comparisons to authentic log siding, so you can see steel’s relative advantages and disadvantages.

Average Cost To Install New Siding Typical Range: $5,240 - $8,130
See costs in your area

That Appeal of Log Siding

Log siding makes a home look solid, warm, and inviting. It is classic siding with unsurpassed charm.

Steel log siding remarkably mimics the look and texture of wood while eliminating the worst aspects of real log siding – high maintenance costs and susceptibility to insects, rot and fire.

What is Steel Log Siding?

Here are the basics of this material often called fake log siding.

Lightweight G-90 galvanized steel 26 gauge (thicker) and 28-gauge steel is used. The material is stamped with authentic wood texture: cedar, pine, weathered wood and more. Some designs include faux chinking.

Durable coatings are designed to resist fading, cracking, and blistering. Foam backer inserts are added for stability and an R-value of 3 to 4.

Steel log siding is installed using the same techniques and accessories as standard steel or vinyl siding, so the process goes quickly. The siding is backed with very good warranties discussed below.

Read more

Vinyl Siding vs. Stucco Cost, Plus Pros & Cons 2022

The #1 siding material versus the #2 siding material in America. Think you know which is #1 already? Don’t be so quick with that guess.

Comparing Stucco and Vinyl – Top Factors

While both siding materials offer great variation of styles and profiles, each has two primary applications. For vinyl that includes hollow-back (non-insulated) and foam-back (insulated) siding.

Likewise, for stucco, it is usually applied in a single coat (less insulation) or in three coats (greater insulation).

Cost Factor

Cost is generally a determining factor for most homeowners. Insulated vinyl siding is more expensive (at $9.50 to $12.50 per sq. ft. installed) than non-insulated (at $7.50 to $9.50 per sq. ft. installed).

Yet, the high-end insulated vinyl costs about the same as the low end of Stucco (at $9.50 to $15.50 per sq. ft. installed).

Stucco, on average, goes as high as $16.50 per sq. ft. installed, which translates to $33,000 for 2,000 square feet of stucco installed on a typical house. Being more budget-friendly is a significant reason why vinyl is such a popular siding option.

Average Cost To Install New Siding Typical Range: $5,240 - $8,130
See costs in your area

Durability Factor

Durability is the measure of how tough the siding material is and how well it will hold up over time. Both materials score well. With vinyl, the thickness of the siding matters significantly. — This doesn’t include foam-back, but rather it is about the thickness of material itself.

The mid-range options are .042 to .046 inches, while top of the line is .055 or higher. Compare this to a single coat of stucco which hovers around a half inch, or about 10 times the thickness of vinyl. 😉

Both materials are fairly tough. Vinyl can withstand wind speeds up to 110 mph, while Stucco can handle wind gusts up to 130 mph. Vinyl gets mixed results on resistance to hail damage.

Obviously, thicker siding means more resistance, but even top of the line is susceptible to some damage. Stucco offers better impact resistance, though large enough pieces of hail or other materials could lead to cracks.

Assuming proper installation and avoidance of disasters, both materials will last more than 50 years. With care, vinyl last between 40 and 75 years before needing replacement.

Stucco can last 60 to 100 years before it needs replacing, thus making if the more durable option.

Insulation Factor

Comparing the less insulated versions of either is not all that fair, though surprisingly vinyl would win.

Stucco gets .20 per inch R-value, or the standard for measuring insulation. The single coat, half inch is going to be fairly low, while hollow-back vinyl comes in around .60.

The triple coat of stucco raises the R-value to, at most .75. While that is decent, it is not even in the same ballpark as the 1.75 R-value that foam-back vinyl achieves. 😉

Read more